Group A. COTS-based development and life cycle processes: how they involve requirements.

- Scope of requirements in COTS-based systems.

-        User services.

-        COTS-based system development or integration.

-        COTS product level.

- Influencing factors when determining requirements.

-        Business case.

-        Old vs. new requirements.

-        Market drivers.

-        Supplier characteristics (responsiveness, maturity, evolution path, …).

-        Requirements as evaluation criteria.

- COTS add some uncertainty…

-        All the existing COTS taken into account?

-        Some COTS properties may be uncontrollable.

- …then we need a risk-driven process.

-        Prioritise requirements.

-        Start with full but coarse-grain requirements coverage.

-        Use multi-stage COTS filtering processes with increasing detail.

- Life cycle concurrent in nature.

-        Concurrently engineer requirements, architecture and COTS selection.

-        Concurrent stakeholder negotiation, prototyping, architecture analysis, COTS evaluation, business case analysis.

- Some properties of requirements for COTS-based systems.

-        Assurance requirements: safety, security.

-        Need for more flexible and adaptable requirements.

-        Licensing.

 

Group B. Evaluation of requirements.

- Matching requirements with descriptions.

-        The level of precision is not clear.

-        Adoption of decision-making techniques.

- Descriptions of COTS products. Needed for matching requirements with products.

-        Need of structured descriptions.

-        Taxonomies of COTS products.

-        Need to describe not only products but also suppliers.

-        Aim at reusing descriptions in different contexts.

-        Knowledge management: who, when, …

-        Configuration management, mainly how to evolve descriptions when new releases of COTS products are delivered.

- Trust of the information available about COTS products.

-        Third-party certification.

-        Quality assurance by COTS supplier.

-        Legal issues (consequences of failures if the information available is not true).

- Dependencies among COTS.

-        Dependencies impact on requirements elicitation and analysis.

-        Models to represent dependencies are required.

- “Instant” testing. That is, how to test requirements on freshly obtained COTS (e.g., demo versions available on the web).

-        Third-party testing.

 

Group C. Negotiation of requirements. Types of requirements.

- Factors affecting negotiation.

-        Risk.

-        Evidence.

-        Justification of decisions.

-        Prioritisation.

-        Taking COTS upgrades into account.

- Research issues related to negotiation.

-        Determining what’s negotiable.

-        Decision model for negotiation/selection.

-        Decision model for deciding whether customise, adapt or build.

-        Models for generic requirements and services.

-        Vendor Maturity Model.

- Requirements on vendors.

-        Trust - reputation.

-        Financial viability.

-        Organizational structure.

-        Size.

-        Market share.

-        CMM level (or process maturity in general).

- Requirements on products.

-        Scope.

-        Compositionality.

-        Maskability.

-        Architecture requirements.

-        Portability.

-        Maturity - reliability.

-        Flexibility – customisation.

-        Learning – training.

-        Installation.